100 comments on “Things you should know about migraines…

  1. Renee Bradbury Post author

    Both me and my mom have the same migraine trigger which is both helpful and horrible. (Yay patchouli 😑)

    Reply
  2. Ellie Shutyourmouth Post author

    i go blind in one eye and partially blind in the other and after the migraine, every time i move my head, i can feel the muscles in the area where the migraine occurred strain and have a burning, aching pain. Also, instead of the migraine affecting my speech, it effects my ability to write, which is super fun when i have one in class and my teacher just thinks i'm faking it to get out of work, when i just wrote the wrongest concoction of words, spelling every word horribly wrong, replacing "k"s with "p"s and "r"s with "a"s. migraines are..messy.

    edit: almost forgot to mention that "the prodome" i experience as a warning sign is experiencing the symptoms of being about to faint (tunnel vision – which eventually gets replaced by blindness, lightheadedness, ringing in both ears and muffled hearing, etc), and if i'm standing up, i will actually start to sway and eventually pass out, fun!

    Reply
  3. Rebecca Grubb Post author

    My usual solution (I wouldn't even call this a solution because it just makes my migraines less-awful) 1. find a way to crawl to my shower and turn it on as hot as possible 2. yell for my partner to please bring my a ton of water and headache meds (Goody's powder is my fave) 3. take medication, chug water, and sit in fetal position facing away from the shower head so it will run on my neck/shoulders/head on the side that my migraine is.

    After about twenty minutes I get out and make coffee to try to get more caffeine in my system.

    Also note that all of this must be done in the dark because I am extremely sensitive to light

    Reply
  4. gizmotheartsykitten Post author

    I have chronic migraines. I was diagnosed after I had a 6 week long migraine. Since I didn't know that my headaches that I had been having for the past 6 years were migraines. I just learned to ignore them. Or at least try to. I need to actually learn what my actual symptoms are besides the pain.

    Reply
  5. Simply Vince Post author

    Wait… So when my eyes stop seeing and my mind sees brown/yellow geometric shapes for a few seconds… Oh! That makes so much sense. I've been having that since I was like 8. The actual headaches didn't start until closer to 12, and the awful hide from light migraines didn't start until about 14, but yeah. I'm very familiar with visual disturbances… I never put the two together. Wow. Okay.

    Reply
  6. Madolan Mckenzie Post author

    After going over a year with "only" 4 hour to 1 day migraines and now being on day 3 of calling in sick to work I really needed to hear all this, thankyou

    Reply
  7. damprye gothica Post author

    I've had migraines since I was about 7yrs old. Luckily for me any blindness and other visual disturbances have only been temporary

    Reply
  8. Charlie B. Post author

    I use a cherry pit bag over my eyes… it’s a humid heat which for some reason helps a little, at least to help me get to sleep. Also tea blend designed to soothe headaches helps a little doesn’t make it go away completely but it does help make it slightly more tolerable… I also wear earplugs but I have issues with everything being too loud

    Reply
  9. Grace Post author

    My migraines are so severe sometimes I just curl up in agony and wonder why I can't get a new head….??? somehow…??

    Reply
  10. bodysnatchers 4 ever Post author

    Whenever a migraine strikes, I essentially just roll on the floor from the pain, gasping for air, eyes watering from the pressure/pain. My vision goes black for a full minute(due to my hypotension) which doesn't sound a lot but it feels much longer to me. The pain is so piercing that I need to puke. Puking makes it worse. After I take a disgusting amount of aspirin it takes me around 20' to hours to recover

    Reply
  11. bodysnatchers 4 ever Post author

    -I have a migraine
    Me: take some aspirin
    -nah I'll just sit it out it'll stop eventually
    meanwhile if I don't take aspirin the migraine will literally never go away but will only get worse day by day. Like it genuinely won't stop unless I stop it

    Reply
  12. George Robins Post author

    As someone who has headaches pretty much all the time, migraines are so so so so much worse. The only thing worse than migraines is cluster headaches (which is basically 5000 headaches stacked on top of each other)

    Reply
  13. Emily Nicole Post author

    Oh man…my coping mechanism is taking my meds,playing in bed in the pitch black, and refusing to open my eyes so I don't have to see the flashes. And sometimes, if I'm feeling frisky and remember to grab it before the big hit of pain, I'll grab a hot compress to try to deal with the incredible pain that crosses my neck and shoulders.
    You know. If I'm feeling cheeky.
    Thanks for letting me know I'm not alone 💗

    Reply
  14. Isabel Emma Post author

    I used to have really bad migraines. Ones where I thought it might be a good idea to split open my brain to relieve the pain, it hurt so so much. I couldnt feel my hands, see where I was going and every sound, movement, just everything would hurt so bad. I also had it quite often… every second day and then random (not cyclus) weeks of nothing. And I couldn't speak or write probably to notify anyone around me that I was having a migraine. Thank god my school nurse, parents of friends and my mum were very understanding and I always had someone to call an adult to pick me up from school. My doctor gave me sibelium for a few months and my migraine only came back once after 12 months so I took it again and since then I'm migraine free. It's been 8 years!

    Reply
  15. Killcupidsaaki17 Post author

    I have chronic episodic migraines since i was a kid (braindamage from an accident caused sweeling and bleeding on the brain and the pressure caused trouble) there will be a streak of a few good weeks and even months and then ill have a running migraine for about a month. Like some days it will be manageable just throbbing,, and some days im puking from how much it hurts and cant stand from dizziness.

    My co pilots are water, ibuprofen, and icepacks on the back of my neck. The coolness helps with the nausea quite a bit

    Reply
  16. K.B. Schweitzer Post author

    Hi, I have chronic migraines so this was great to watch.
    Some things that help me is a cold compress to the back of my neck. I also have an eye mask that has lavender in it. It provides some pressure on the eyes which helps me with my auras. And then I sleep and hope for the best.

    Reply
  17. Kamila F Post author

    Guys, go to GP/neurologist/specialist if you have migraines. I have them since I was 11 years old. I know what type of food to avoid (cheese, chocolate, cured meats, sweets, heavily processed food, oranges, mandarins), I don't drink alcohol I don't smoke and I take a low dose of amitriptyline for prevention and rizatriptan when I feel the migraine coming. I used to have a heavy aura in my eye, my arm/jaw felt funny I was also nauseous, slow. Sumatriptan in the past gave me an allergic reaction that caused me feeling like it was a stroke. Since trying proper medication (touch wood) things have improved. It's not perfect, but it is better. Also stress is a huge factor and unfortunately when I stress out about something it can hit me pretty hard. I also once had something that doctor said was a stomach migraine? I was under lots of stress. I know that some people take beta-blockers/other type of medication for prevention of migraines, all of it when consulted with a specialist is worth trying, to see if it might help. The worst option is just "dealing with it", taking over the counter medication that does not help and crying in the dark. I've been there and do not recommend it. Go to the doctor and check what could help you and improve your life.

    Reply
  18. Saskia Coffin Post author

    I’ve found that this herbal remedy cream called ‘tiger balm’ really helps, i rarely have a day without a headache or migraine. I wouldn’t say that it solves anything but it most definitely reduces the effect.

    Reply
  19. Virginia Tracy Post author

    Thank you for making this video. I'm a 65-year-old migraineur and first had migraines in my mid 20's. I get so <insert favorite string of curses here> tired of being told migraines are "just headaches. I retired a year and a half early because the chronic (15-20 day's a month) migraines and my management's refusal to acknowledge that I had a disability and thus a valid reason to take sick leave finally wore a giant whole in my ability to cope. Not to mention eroding my ability to control my temper… Retirement has been good to me.

    Reply
  20. Katalyn Ford Post author

    Good chance you already know this but just in case: my doctor told me that POTS patients tend to burn through electrolytes at a crazy fast rate, so she had me start taking a double dose of this sports sodium tablet with electrolytes as a daily vitamin and my migraines have gone down significantly since then… So, if you aren't already dealing with this aspect of POTS it might help? Fingers crossed for you!

    Reply
  21. George Cooper Post author

    I remember once while I had a migraine I decided I needed some food to help with the nausea so I started shuffling to the kitchen with a blanket over my head to reduce light and noise but then the light from the kitchen plus the effort of standing up was so painful I just ended up curled in a ball on the ground of the hallway with a blanket over my head. Only got halfway to the kitchen.

    Reply
  22. George Cooper Post author

    I once got a migraine after a netball game and then immediately had a team horse riding practice… It was a lot of stop- vomit- get on the horse and keep going.

    Reply
  23. Ellen Durkee Post author

    My migraines were like yours, they'd last 3-5 days I'm get maybe 5 or 6 days a month where i wasnt having or recovering from one. I've cut them by 75% in number and strength. I now use Cannabis oil. A drop every night an hour before bed. I suspect that getting a good nights sleep is a huge help. Its almost a miracle for me. When I do get them now they're much less painful, I can actually function.

    Reply
  24. Ellen Durkee Post author

    One more thing, I do know of one person who took a pretty big dose of cannabis oil during a bad one( maybe 1/4 gram), he'd been throwing up all day , he took the oil, slept 4 hours then didnt have another for 4 months

    Reply
  25. nikanna75 Post author

    yeah, migraines run in my family and I actually had the childhood periodic syndromes, I used to have migraines once a week, now it's down to once two weeks because I'm on birth control with a diuretic derivative. But when I do actually have a migraine and I have this incredible neck stiffness the only thing that helps are triptanes, and they are so expensive 🙁 (thank god not as expensive as they used to be in their beginning on the market). What is interesting my grandfather had severe migraines but they suddenly stopped after he had his stomach removed due to gastric cancer (early stage and he survived 8 years) – but I'd rather keep my migraines than have cancer.

    Reply
  26. Vania Angelus Post author

    PSA: Look into Botox for migraines. My mum had chronic migraines for years and our doctor suggested botox and it seriously helped. It might be costly depending on where you live because most medical insurance companies won't cover it because botox is mainly for cosmetic use.

    Reply
  27. Keelan C Post author

    i have chronic headaches and sometimes migraines. Awful headaches like 90% of the time and then some times a surprise migraine thrown in for variety….Fun. One time I couldn't see properly for an hour from my left eye during an art class bc it was like my vision from that eye had become entirely like TV Static. When I tried to explain this to a doctor though they just looked confused so this video made me relieved when you brought up "somebody needs to tune the television" bc hey someone gets it and im not just going mad/making it up!!

    Reply
  28. Lydia Robinett Post author

    I get migraines. Fortunately most of mine I have warning signs that if I don't medicate immediately, nothing but time will make it better. Some however, start when I'm sleeping…so visual cues don't really work.

    Reply
  29. Solar powered potato Post author

    My ex used to get migraines often, yet she would still continue on with her day like normal. Meanwhile, I get a MILD headache, and I'm taking acetaminophen and laying in bed.

    Reply
  30. Teresa Fisher Post author

    I had them for years. When I was in my late 40s I had a complete hysterectomy and haven’t had one since. I always wondered if mine were hormonal. Love your videos

    Reply
  31. Isaac Fontes Post author

    I had a migraine for 2 weeks straight and they had to keep checking if I had brain damage and to this day my memory is not the same

    Reply
  32. APM Post author

    There's nothing worst that the f*uckers that turn on the lights while you're having one! Now at least I can send this video to everyone that tells me I'm being dramatic

    Reply
  33. Ruthie's Corner Post author

    I suffer terribly with migraines and sometimes throwing up with them! Ugh, I hate it when people say "its just a headache". I usually wake up with them, so I can't stop or try and prevent it with medication, because by the time I wake up it's already full-blown. I also can't lie down in a dark room, because I just concentrate on the pain more, and it's not gonna go away any time soon. I don't get the visual effects, like spots and stuff, but I do vomit, a lot!

    Reply
  34. Fiona Heal Post author

    Reliefs that work for me: peppermint oil on my temples and any areas of my face where the pain is, diffusing lavender oil, heat wrap around my shoulders, hot shower, sleep, sushi (the perfect mild combination of a protein and carb), coke, cbd/thc edibles or vaping

    Reply
  35. Alicia M Post author

    I’ve taken up needle felting. So long as you remember to wear the finger guards it doesn’t require amazing dexterity, it can be done in fairly low light, while laying down, in a small space (like, say, your bedroom closet migraine bunker), lets you express your inner torment and anguish through art, is relatively cheap, is quiet, and can I say just how amazingly cathartic stabbing a piece of wool over and over and over is when you’re in pain?

    Reply
  36. KimMieAhn Post author

    I used to work for a boss who said a migraine is not a valid reason to miss work. I get migraines with the sensitivity to light and sometimes the pupil of my right eye would dilate causing extreme pain from light and nausea but would still have to go to work with an eye patch covering my right eye not to mention the bouts of vertigo needless to say I quit that job as soon as I could afford to.

    Reply
  37. Brenna Leano Post author

    So the docs are unsure if my headaches are migraines or incredibly intense and painful tension headaches, but what works best for me is to take a NSAID and a tylenol then I will lie down with a heat pack behind my neck and a ice pack on the top of my crown. This usually helps make it survivable and not quite as excruciating.

    Reply
  38. Florence Bloem Post author

    It is so strangely encouraging to hear someone voice every symptom I have with my migraines. Right now I'm trying to figure out life with chronic migraines (daily..yaaaaay), and your videos honestly help me so much, even just as simple minutes of joy.

    Reply
  39. Rowan Nieuport Post author

    Migraines run in my family, my mother had so many, much more than me, and they stopped when she hit menopause. My migraines were with me when i was 5, i remember watching the aura but not feeling pain that i can remember. Had some really bad ones now and again, when i was a teenager. The aura occurred slowly and gradually expanded to cover my vision but moved beyond it in one half to one hour. I could have lots of nausea then, so i mostly covered my eyes and laid down in my darkened room and slept for a few hours. Usually the migraine was still going but was at a later phase.

    I don't seem to get a really bad one but rarely today. I take a medicine called Topiramate in a low dose that prevents me from getting the things for years on end. It is a tiny little pill. The physician said i might as well stop taking it, but the next day i had the worse migraine in years–needless to say, i am back on the medicine. It seems to have no side effects on me except to stop migraines.

    Reply
  40. T F Post author

    I can only recommend tracking migraines with an app. I already knew that I had hormonal migraines, it was super obvious. But tracking made me realize how often I just holed up in my room, unconciously avoiding any triggers (light and movement mostly) and beating myself up afterwards for being lazy.
    When I'm on my period, I can be mostly fine for the whole day, probably won't notice the pain (if I hav enough things to distract me), but once I encounter a strong light: HERE IS THE MIGRAINE!!! DID YOU MISS ME? YOU DIDN'T THINK I'M STILL HERE, DID YOU? … My subconsiousness already had it figured out, telling me that I actually really don't want to leave the house or lie back down after breakfast, or sit away from the window. I just didn't notice how much it was influencing my behaviour.
    Also taking hormonal contraceptives can cause, worsen, lessen, "cure" or not influence hormonal migraines, depending on… I don't know what… but if one type of pill doesn't help, another one might. So it is a thing of: try this for a month or two. If it doesn't help, then try that for a month or two.

    Reply
  41. Nekog1rl Post author

    OH MY STARS. Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood. That was me until about age 35, (I also suffer from migraines with aura to this day.)

    Reply
  42. LittleDropOfEmpathy Post author

    My fiance broke out some peppermint oil one time when I had a really really bad migraine and rubbed it on my temples. It actually seemed to help.

    Reply
  43. Secondhand Stories Post author

    When I have a migraine sometimes I will lay in a hot bath with my ears just under the water for about 10-15 minutes. I don't know if it's a pressure thing but usually at about minute 2 the pain subsides enough where I don't feel like my brain is trying to burrow through my right eye. It is, unfortunately, temporary relief. However, if I can catch the symptoms fast enough I can take my medication then take a bath. On those days I feel like it doesn't last quite as long and the burrowing is more of spoon and less of an electric drill.

    Reply
  44. Michelle Davis Post author

    THANK YOU! Someone needs to be talking about this! It's honestly ridiculous that I have to have a Dr's note every time I get a migraine, just so I can pass classes on attendance.

    Reply
  45. ThirrinDiamond Post author

    why is there a faint ringing throughout the video.. thought i was going insane for a second XD

    Reply
  46. K k Post author

    I have ocular migraines and they suck so much.
    I have bad headaches frequently, but they never accompany my migraines (or very rarely do)

    Reply
  47. Cassyzp Post author

    I have chronic migraines and a thing that helps me is using peppermint essential oil. I put a drop of two in my finger and then massage my temples for about 30 seconds. Now I use the oil in a roll-on glass, but it’s the same. Helps A LOT with migraines and nausea episodes. Just be careful while trying because it obviously has a strong scent and it can be a trigger to sensitive nostrils. But it does wonders for me. Also when is really bad I take an antihistamine that has sleepiness as a side effect so I can sleep. Not the best strategy but sometimes is what keeps me from banging my head on the wall.

    Reply
  48. Pottah Post author

    I mean I was just ordering my pumpkin spice latte and I suddenly spoke alien. Kinda like "I'd like a grande spimshish pimsh lats". Yeah. Lovely.

    Reply
  49. izzy Post author

    I once had a three week long migraine and it didn't go away until i accidentally slept for 19 hours but everyone thought i was being dramatic because "how can you have a headache for /that/ long?"

    Reply
  50. Nicole Craig Post author

    I had several week-long migraines at one point in my life… People told me to "stop using headaches as an excuse"… First time I think I ever seriously contemplated murder but was too sick to move.
    Those week-long lovlies were triggered by mold that was in the walls of my apartment at the time. I've not had one that long since.
    Sometimes I'll get a 24-hr one or one that lasts a few days… The biggest trigger for me is stress as my brain lacks the chemicals it needs to deal with stress properly… Or so I was told… Add into the equation I'm autistic… So I stress out far too often. Fun times… What's even funner is when both stress AND allergies trigger one… At that point, I'm not sure whether I should stay in bed or camp out in the bathroom.
    I really, really, despise people who tell me to "take some pills" and act as if I can fully function despite the fact I feel like my brain is in a malfunctioning mammogram machine that is smashing too hard and won't release.

    Reply
  51. BassLove520 Post author

    For me, a cool compress on my neck, a dark room, some Tylenol, and caffeinated tea help. That list used to include Aleve, but since I'm on blood thinners and can't take them anymore, I use Tylenol. Boy, I miss my Aleve…

    Reply
  52. Frances Dierken Post author

    I have migraines and I have a prescription pill I take to make them go away! I found out about them because my mom gets migraines and has the pills so I asked my doctor for them too and they worked. But they also have a lot of.. unpleasant side effects. The pills give me the tingle/prickling sensation! They don't always make me 'functional' or useful to work (thank you capitalism for valuing me based on my ability to provide labor) but they almost always take the pain away.

    Reply
  53. Roger O'Donnell Post author

    The only time I REALLY want chocolate – and I mean 'Tell me who you want dead, and I'll do it on national TV for a Mars bar' REALLY – is in the run up to a migraine.

    Reply
  54. tha slump child Post author

    i’ve had a migraine so bad it made me vomit . i was shaken up so much from crying and screaming i ended up throwing up .

    Reply
  55. Annie Graham Post author

    Yesssss. Most people don't understand how terrible they are. I get numb limbs and vision loss and then a REALLY REALLY bad headache… They don't happen often but when they do I am useless.

    Reply
  56. SA Howe Post author

    I was recently informed by a neurologist that my daily (24/7) headaches (which usually aren't so painful as to be debilitating) are most likely migraines. I didn't realize this was even a thing and I've had migraines since I was 7. I relate to this video so much! Especially the issues with finding words, sensitivity to sound, prickling and crawly sensations all over, and nausea. My aura is dark spots flying around and/or dimmed vision in one eye. The only medication I can take to help is debilitating (knocks me out) so I try not to take it often. Ugh.

    Reply
  57. Samantha Hatt Post author

    Chronic hemiplegic migraine sufferer here 💁‍♀️ chiropractor and osteopath are life savers

    Reply
  58. The Rich Life Post author

    I have had migraines since I was 10 thats 27 years now. Things that work for me: T1s(thats assitaminophane-or paracetamol with caffine and codine x3 and 2 extra strength advil liquid gells, now this doesnt take all the pain away, just makes it more bearable. If stiff muscles are included in the symptoms add a couple of Robaxacet silvers. Now i have cleared these together with my pharmasist. Other things that can help is Frankinsence oil taken under the tounge, just a drop or 2. Peppermint essential oil on your thumb and press it to the roof of your mouth, with essential oils make sure they are pure, organic, with no fillers. I personally use Young Living and also trustt DoTerra. Other than that lying down in a dark room with a tv show or youtube playing softly to help distract me. Good luck on your journey.

    Reply
  59. Finch Alien Overlord Post author

    Headache: Your head hurts, you get over it.
    Migraine: Your skull is trying to crush your brain, you just can't handle light/screens/any noise, you get dizzy, you're in so much pain you NEED medication or you cry and make it worse.

    Reply
  60. Serrobi Post author

    Oh man are they painful… Mine usually start with a the feeling that someone is knocking behind my eyes I end up squinting and looking like a 1 eyed pirate with no patch… Usually my right eye… I already am photosensitive so then fluorescent lights make it worse… Imagine this happening while teaching a room full of 1st graders… Thankfully OTC meds work but there have been many times when they haven't worked completely. Sometimes silence and a dark room helps. 🤷🏿‍♀️

    Reply
  61. Wisdom Pen Post author

    One of my medications gives migraines so I take a secound medication that is meant to help reduce them and a third one that is for sleep and general pain relief…the first one is an anti-depressant…FUN!!!

    Reply
  62. Hannah Forman Post author

    Its strange you brought up pregnancy-I had horrible migraines my whole life starting from around age 8,Turns out my biological aunt has them also, Anyway- I got pregnant at 25 with my daughter, and i swear the migraines really have calmed in the 2 years since ive had her and I didnt have but only a handful in the 9 months i was actually pregnant! I went from having 12-15 migraines a month to having maybe 4 in a full month…But of course the ones i do have now are more powerful and keep me bedridden for 2 to 3 days in a dark room with an icepack on the literally throbbing vein in my temple. My migraines have always only affected one side of my head or the other,directly behind my eye/temple… Ive just recently stumbled on to your channel and i love how blunt you are about physical and mental illness. Makes me feel not so alone. ALSO you asked for treatments that us,viewers do. Mine is simple and im sure you have done it as well but I take a gel ice pack directly to the area of pain,800 mg Ibuprofen and the ONLY medicine ive ever found to have ever worked is a medicine called ,Maxalt. ive tried dozens of hard core migraine meds and Maxalt is the only one that has worked. If you havnt tried Maxalt yet, maybe see if your doctor could tell you about it.But either way, one day i hope you are able to find relief and a pain/migraine free life. People dont get how a "headache" like a migraine can cripple you for days. Love your channel and im a happily new subscriber <3

    Reply
  63. Emma Bennett Post author

    every time i get a migraine i get rushed to the er and get an mri while everyone freaks out that it's a stroke and then i get charged $1000 for them to tell me i have a "atypical migraine with unusual side effects" and that i need to consume as much caffeine as possible to get it to go away…… 🙁

    Reply
  64. tanya Post author

    God I hate migraines. And then people are like do you mean headaches. Bitch 2 different doctors diagnosed me with it. It's genetic. And I had my first one at age 11.

    Reply
  65. skyxe rain Post author

    the first time I got a migraine I had no idea it was a migraine, but it got so bad I had to be sent home from school and the slightest movement or light would drive me crazy and make me incredibly nauseous 😪 I ended up throwing up what little lunch I had! 😬thanks for this video, jessica – it was actually really helpful and informative :’)❤️

    Reply
  66. jadie-May dredd Post author

    I used to have migraines every week but at the time I didn’t know what a migraine was so I thought something was wrong with my brain. fingerscrossed I haven’t had one in over a year now tho

    Reply
  67. Elizabeth Smyth Post author

    I get migranes infrequently, but usually come with stroke like aura symptoms, which are terrifying- losing the ability to move to feel any sensation in my left arm, numb face, forgetting words, numbers (I once forgot my parents number, that I have had memorized since I was 4, so had to drive a manual car home for 30 minutes before to pain started)

    I get light sensitivity, nausea (hands up if you've vomited during a migraine, makes it feel like the top of you head is going to volcanically erupt), so I find that keeping anti nausea meds on hand in my migrane kit is very helpful.
    So for me what works is:
    Anti nausea meds, no food (because I vomit a lot, so might not apply to others) then something with some high proportion of codeine combination and I also take asprin with those because I think mine are caused by vasoconstriction and the blood thinning really makes a big difference for my migranes.

    I have had someone suggest than aspirin and codene together might not be wonderful, but they had no medical training and I found something that helped me actually lessen a indescribably painful sensation, so I'm going to need a very good argument against before I let that coping mechanism go. I also get light and sound sensitivity, so a pitch dark room, bed alone (no movement) with a very quiet audio book because I want to focus on anything but the pain.

    Mine seem to be connected with stress and overexposure to sun, so I hide from the sun like crazy, which people generally understand because I'm a redhead living in Australia, although not everyone.

    I also get incredible euphoria post migranes, I mean very strong, so explaining to people that I'm not on drugs and reminding myself not to make too many decisions until I 'come down' is useful.

    Thankyou so much for the video, it's really wonderful to have more information and to have a common/uncommon expirience accessible.

    Reply
  68. OutOfTheKlosset Post author

    For me: I use caffeine pills instead of relying on soda bc it's easier to get water in for me instead of bubbles & I can't drink tea or coffee bc of tannins. I also use a tiny bit of Voltaren (nsaid) gel on my temples and back of neck. I find that darkness but not pitch dark helps but also earplugs and lying on my right side with a heating pad on my left side. I have ice water on hand, yummy smelling lotion and a duvet over the heating pad. (((Gentle hugs and support)))) Thank you for making this!

    P.S
    I once lost my vision in both eyes from a migraine and it made everything look like I was just in a white room where I couldn't see anything else. I was in the grocery store and I literally crawled out of the store and somehow half walked/half crawled home. I was not thrilled. 😩

    Reply
  69. thesleepingbeauty12 Post author

    I'm not positive if what I've gotten a couple times is actually a migraine or just a really, really horrible headache. I know migraines run in my mom's family (though they seem to be more common in the men in our family – both my uncle and my brother have them). I haven't experienced auras, but will have bilateral headache plus neck pain, nausea, light/sound/smell sensitivity, unusual appetite changes, etc. Fortunately it's pretty rare for me, but I mostly rely on blue-light filters on my electronics, blue-light filtering glasses, and generally doing my best to avoid light. I also keep away from strong smells as much as possible and try to make my room cold and/or get in the direct path of a fan because it makes me feel better when I'm in pain.

    Reply
  70. NekoGrace 79 Post author

    I suffer migraines at the same level as you do but I still have my hearing (although I do know sign so I’m prepared I guess). I have so many food triggers, and triggers in general, that I can’t eat hardly any fruit. Like grapes and apples only. I’m currently battling a migraine that will not leave me alone and watching YT doesn’t help but it relaxes me at least. Even tho I see a neurologist I only know 1 other person with migraines. It’s a lonely feeling when ppl don’t understand your pain, even your parents. Thank you for this video.

    Reply
  71. Louise Louise Post author

    I had my first (and most severe) migraine while on holiday in Spain. It’s bad enough having a migraine but worse when you’re in a country where you can’t speak the language and you don’t know what a migraine is

    Reply
  72. Kathryn Harris Post author

    I have been really having a tough time with this in the past year. I feel your pain; literally. I had about six months of serotonin syndrome that wasn’t recognized as such. We were in the Dominican Republic and I’d been switching back and forth from Spanish to English quite a lot (my husband speaks no Spanish…yes, I KNOW). Anyway, I got to experience a lovely neurological phenomenon a few times called multilingual aphasia. This happens to people who have more than one language stored in their brains. If one of those languages (as In my case) is learned in mid childhood and beyond, it will be stored in a different part of the brain, because we lose what we don’t use in mostly than 0 to age 3 years range. Those neutro connections get lost; necessitating the new language being stored separately from the native tongue. So with this aphasia (and it’s not well understood at all), apparently one part storing one language can be affected while the part storing the other is not. So there I was in HORRIBLE pain (serotonin syndrome is more than a migraine—but it’s a principal part) from my head, muscles in spasm, I was disoriented with awful vertigo, would lose time, was nauseated and vomiting, had tinnitus—it is something I would never wish on ANYONE. I would have gladly and with no thought given my right arm; make that both arms, than live the rest of my life dealing with these episodes. Anyway; I was sooo miserable and disoriented anyway, and then all of a sudden I couldn’t think of English words to talk to my husband with! It was just; well, beyond description. The good news is that our pharmacist (or chemist as our UK friends call them) caught onto what was happening when even the ER (A & E) doctors could not. It turns out that serotonin syndrome OFTEN goes unrecognized and can even be fatal. And it isn’t just antidepressants that cause this—even some over the counter medications; such as the active ingredient in cough syrup, can cause it—particularly in combination with other meds and supplements. Opioids (some more than others), some sleeping pills, and St John’s Wort are among them. We with chronic illnesses tend to be a walking pharmaceutical biochemistry experiment, and that experiment CAN go really wrong with the physician recognizing it because most patients don’t require several powerful drugs at once; while most of US need them just to survive. The point is that if you are having atypical migraines and you are on a combination of different meds, have your pharmacist or chemist review what you are on (INCLUDING OTC and herbal stuff) and make sure it’s not serotonin syndrome. While I still get migraines today; I don’t have it with quite all the other motor/sensory/aphasia I had. It’s still a lot to cope with, but it’s better. As far as remedies, I’m trying Migrelief right now, which a hospital nurse recommended and swears by it for her own migraines. I’ve also just started on a magnesium supplement. Depending on the type (do look them up), magnesium has been cited as beneficial for migraines, depression, anxiety, ADHD, and constipation. If anyone finds a version that’s effective and the pills are small—PLEASE SHARE. Most are huge!! I also use binaural beats and hypnosis as well, to some effect.

    Binaural beats tracks:

    https://youtu.be/jyqaGX3UANE (30 min)

    https://youtu.be/NtVcJQorKWk (90 min)

    Hypnosis tracks:

    https://youtu.be/s_SMIouQGps (60 min)

    https://youtu.be/U4s6L6WWaN8 (30 min)

    Reply
  73. Tree Star Post author

    My migraine ritual is to empty the contents of my stomach, spend some time crying and trying to clean up before bed (because I basically have no choice but to try to pass out once one is full blown) then take a Maxalt (a prescription migraine medication) with Gatorade, and lie down in a pitch black room wishing I had someone to take care of me 😆

    For real though, drinking enough water, eating healthy foods, and trying to keep my stress levels under control help a lot with preventing migraines. Neck massages help a lot as well. And as I mentioned before, Gatorade and Maxalt when it gets bad. My doctor also gave me some exercises/ stretches to do throughout the week, but I'm not entirely sure that they help.

    Good luck to you all on your health and wellness journeys! 💛

    Reply
  74. Lufara Post author

    Sadly I was about 12 to 13 when I got migraines for the first time. I was in school and was supposed to read out of our book, there was cold white light. Boom. Blurriness, couldn't see in part of my vision and almost vomited. My school wouldn't let me leave bc "It's just a headache, sweety."

    Usually I get a squiggly aura in the field of vision that I'm losing. So I am having a classical migraine.

    Reply
  75. Mary Phillips Post author

    When the pain gets so bad that I start getting lightheaded and the pain goes away but I look/act like I'm stoned as fuck, but it still feels like it hurts even tho I can't feeel the pain, then vision goes out for a while and it's like thx eyes, and mum's like "oh an aura" I'm like "no, lsd vision" eeeek

    OH fuck and a couple times, half of my body just *gave up*, went pins needles and I almost fell over cause my left ass cheek stopped keeping my sitting & left arm couldn't catch me woooo… Maybe that's more than a migraine but nobody believes me on it :D, WAIT I TYPED THIS LITERALLY SECONDS BEFORE YOU MENTIONED THIS
    I indeed didn't panic about stroke, but about breaking my neck b/c I'd just had a tic and threw my head to the side the first time, then it happened again amd i was like 'oh this went away last time'

    Reply
  76. wicked alien Post author

    i'm so grateful to hear you talk about hemiplegic migraines, when i first started getting migraines no medical professional could or would tell me what was going on and i was just told i have 'complex' migraines, once i was informed of the term hemiplegic migraine it immediately helped me relax knowing that other people experienced the same type of migraine as me which was so important due to the seriousness that comes with feeling like you are having a stroke three times a month

    Reply
  77. Jessica Browne Post author

    I get migraines a couple of times every month and they started when I was 9 (I'm 20 now). I had migraines almost everyday for 3 months when they first started and had a miriad of tests conducted to no avail. I mainly experience light sensitivity and nausea with my migraines. I find that resting a cool wet flannel on my forehead helps a lot and pressure on my forehead as well. Also pain killers but only ibuprofen really works fore and I can't take it because I have acid reflux 🤷 So I just have to wait them out

    Reply
  78. Bree M Post author

    When I sense one coming on the day before or early in the morning, I try to chug as much water as possible and take OTC pain reliever. If I can, I'll take it easy in a dark and quiet room. If it's really bad, sleep seems to be the only thing that quiets the noise of my brain pulsing and exploding in my skull. I get them at least once a month (seems to be tied to my menstrual cycle) and they've definitely increased in quantity and intensity over the last few years. I'm 35 now and I can't wait for more hormonal unpredictability come menopause. Yaaaay.

    Reply
  79. Rachel Cyders Post author

    This is such an excellent and informative video! I suffered from migraines for YEARS before I knew what they were. I genuinely thought everyone had to miss work if they got one of those "really bad" headaches. Took 3 different doctors to finally realize that oh, my weekly headaches were in fact migraines. Before they'd tell me everyone gets a headache from time to time and it was nothing to worry about. Granted, I was so scared to express myself at the doctors that for a while I didn't explain just how bad my "headaches" were. Still, I feel bad for all those years I spent thinking I was much too sensitive to miss work or an event from a "simple headache". I'm glad I can finally give myself grace and properly for care myself when they hit. Finally knowing what was happening too helped my doctor and I find a medication that has lessened the frequency I have migraines too.

    Reply
  80. Nonlinear Thyme Post author

    I have a very long wheat bag that I can heat up in the microwave and wrap the entire way around my head – combined with pain relief it's the only way I can relax. Good luck!

    Reply
  81. A Kirch Post author

    Using amber lense sunglasses indoors (avoiding outdoors if possible), avoid: any quick movements, loud noises, extra crunchy or chewy foods; wear noise-cancelling had phones and play soft music with no high or very low notes – just, like, spa music. CBD drops. Taking medicine and going to bed is a last resort – like nothing is working, and I'm totally useless at doing work rn, I might as well go home and sleep. The triptans usually make me sleepy, and between the medicine and sleep, I usually feel better.
    But not always. One of my main triggers is sudden changes in barometric pressure, so when someone figures out how fix that for me – an olden-days diving bell?, a pressurized suit?, a pressurized chamber like sensory deprivation tanks, but with stabilized pressure? – please let me know! 😅

    Reply
  82. Fluzzbunny Post author

    I used to have migraines for 9 months straight– all days and nights. My doctor and family thought it was just stress, but turns out it was a untreated TMJ. I was SO ready to die lol

    Reply
  83. Yara Leone Post author

    I started to have migraines when I was 6 yo, I'm 28 and people still talk to me like I'm having a headache. For me, the worst ones are associated with my period. f**k 4 to 6 days every single month.
    Coping strategy: Ice packs, cold shower, dark room, lots and lots of water and (I don't know why) chocolate. Maybe chocolate for crying, but I usually try not to because crying make things worst.

    Reply
  84. Liliane E. B. de Magalhães Post author

    after taking something for the pain and staying in a dark room, getting really relaxed ( as in, if possible, getting a massage in the shoulders/neck area) helps a lot, though I've gotten the daith piercing in both my ears and so far, I've been a week without migraines, just getting some of the side effects and light headaches .

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *