Staring at smartphones causes MORE neck and jaw pain in women than men

Staring at smartphones causes MORE neck and jaw pain in women than men


Women have a harder time than me when spending long periods of time staring at their phones, tablets and other electronic devices A study found that the way the neck of a man and a woman bends while holding gadgets is different and can cause more pain in females  Women hunch over and their chin ends up almost on their chest whereas men, who have longer necks, take a more natural pose    This difference results in more stress and pain in the jaw and neck of women, the researchers claim  Scroll down for video  A host of previous research has found that prolonged neck flexion is associated with neck and jaw pain  There is also a clear link between the total time spent using a mobile device and the severity of the neck pain  A study by researchers at the University of Arkansas placed markers on each bone in the neck of 22 participants (12 male, ten female) to identify and differences A licensed radiologists took X-rays at an average distance of six-feet (1.82 meters) away from the participant Images were taken from five positions a natural, fully bent and partly bent, sitting upright, reclining and reclining even further  The reclined positions were designed to mimic lounging around in a chair or sofa and were set at a declination of 15° and 30°   The authors write in the study: ‘The participant sat while holding the tablet in their hand, with no instructions as to the angle of the tablet to allow for a natural posture ‘While the radiograph was taken, participants were instructed to look at a piece of tape in the centre of the tablet and were given a 30 second rest after each radiograph ‘Males in the study were significantly taller than females, with an average height of 5′ 11″ (181 cm) and 5’ 5″ (66 cm), respectively  The researchers claim that the height or the sex, but likely a combination of the two, is to blame for the increased prevalence of pain  Males achieve full neck flexing by using their vertebrae whereas females and shorter individuals achieve the same results by protruding their jaw more  The researchers write: ‘Our results suggest that postures adopted with tablet use vary in relation to height and/or sex  ‘When using tablets or other handheld devices, morphological differences between males and females require different positioning of the jaw and neck  ‘Taller individuals (males in our study) flex their necks more at the articulatio atlantooccipitalis than females, which is likely because their cervical spine is longer and requires more flexion to tilt their heads to a similar angle as females ‘HOW SEVERE IS SMARTPHONE ADDICTION? With the average age for a child to get their first phone now just 10, young people are becoming more and more reliant on their smartphones Worrying research from Korea University suggests that this dependence on the technology could even be affecting some teens’ brains The findings reveals that teenagers who are addicted to their smartphones are more likely to suffer from mental disorders, including depression and anxiety Other studies have shown people are so dependent on their smartphone that they happily break social etiquette to use them Researchers from mobile connectivity firm iPass surveyed more than 1,700 people in the US and Europe about their connectivity habits, preferences and expectations The survey revealed some of the most inappropriate situations in which people have felt the need to check their phone – during sex (seven per cent), on the toilet (72 per cent) and even during a funeral (11 per cent) Nearly two thirds of people said they felt anxious when not connected to the Wi-Fi, with many saying they’d give up a range of items and activities in exchange for a connection Sixty-one per cent of respondents said that Wi-Fi was impossible to give up – more than for sex (58 per cent), junk food (42 per cent), smoking (41 per cent), alcohol (33 per cent), or drugs (31 per cent) A quarter of respondents even went so far as to say that they’d choose Wi-Fi over a bath or shower, and 19 per cent said they’d choose Wi-Fi over human contact

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