Living with arthritis: What’s it like to be diagnosed at a young age?

Living with arthritis: What’s it like to be diagnosed at a young age?


So when were you diagnosed Carrie? I was diagnosed at 18 I was admitted to hospital and that’s when I got diagnosed so after about six months of me initially going to the doctor. What about you? I was 16 when I was diagnosed, but I had been ill for a long time. But they had put it down to growing pains, fibromyalgia, ME all of these things before they thought of arthritis. How about you? I was three so I’m guessing my story is really different to both of you because you know what life was like before-hand and then you got JIA and then I have only ever known living with it so it is slightly different. How was like going to school and attending school like that? Yeah, you know, sometimes I was in a wheelchair, I was having to go to hospital appointments and I think you know what it’s like, every week or you know twice a week. How did you find adapting to college and uni? Well I was actually in year 11 so I was in my GCSE year when I was diagnosed. All the people who were at my school had no idea. I mean they had heard of it because their grandparents probably had it but not because they have it or anybody young has it so they were really confused by it. And when I went to sixth form, again, I was really poorly and I was unable to sit my exams. I sat my exam in my pyjamas. Do you feel that you have to be proactive in the condition? because I think I personally feel that you have to be kind of on top of everything and make sure you’re up to date with your blood results and everything like that to make sure you are getting the best care that you need. we have to live with it in terms of the fact that we have not been diagnosed aged 50 or 60 we have to establish careers while having it and we wouldn’t want to sit there not having a career or not having the life that we wanted for us. No, we are not going to give up. No way When I was doing my GCSEs, so not long after I had been diagnosed it was approaching my biology exam and it was a really important one for me because I wanted to go on and study science afterwards so I had to do well and I was really really poorly. I had been in hospital that morning and they said ‘no, I don’t think you should go back to school we think you need to stay here’. And I was going ‘no, I need to sit this exam, I need to do it’ But I remember feeling just so poorly that day. My hardest day to date, it was probably the second time in my uni that I had come in on a walking stick. So I was walking down the corridor and they had obviously never seen me on this stick and pointed at me and laughed in the middle of a really crowded corridor. I was quite taken aback because I wasn’t expecting that reaction because everyone else had been so sympathetic or just didn’t mention it and just didn’t make a massive fuss. But I remember ringing my parents afterwards and being like ‘why did he laugh?’ and they said: ‘you have got to remember that you were there you showed up and with everything you are going through, you showed up’. And I think that is what I have always got to remember and everyone should remember that even with arthritis you showed up and you are living your life.

19 comments on “Living with arthritis: What’s it like to be diagnosed at a young age?

  1. nimal nimal Post author

    Nice video content! Sorry for the intrusion, I would appreciate your thoughts. Have you heard the talk about – Schallingora Complete Resetting Scheme (google it)? It is a smashing one off product for curing arthritis without the headache. Ive heard some awesome things about it and my old buddy Taylor after a lifetime of fighting got cool results with it.

    Reply
  2. Beachesareawesome 145 Post author

    I've had arthritis since I was born but we didn't know that and I didn't start taking medication till I was in 5th grade because we just thought it was growing pains.

    Reply
  3. Beachesareawesome 145 Post author

    I was in crutches twice, in a sling once, I've taken so many different names of pills that I can't remember them all. It's very hard to control

    Reply
  4. Alex Ensink Post author

    I had the pain from 13 years of age, but It was only taken note of by the doctors when I was 17, I've been told I'm lazy, overweight etc..

    Finally I was diagnosed with Fibro

    Keep fighting guys.

    Reply
  5. Satryo Tjitrosoedarso Post author

    I was diagnosed 4 month's ago and mentality dropped….. I cant go to class in college anymore, cant do a footsteps…. 🙁 … And my friend in classrom and the lecturer doesnt care anything and judging I'm lying…….
    Actually I'm still 18 now
    I studying in another city which so far away from my hometown

    Reply
  6. Wet_Sloth Love Post author

    I was 2 when I was diagnosed with soriatic rheumatoid arthritis, and it sucks. I am currently in remission, but have to stay on medication every week and it causes me to be very nauseous to the point where I am throwing up. I don’t know what life is like without it, but my doctor thinks that I will live with it for the rest of my life. I had problems with my eyes when I was younger, then my wrist, then my ankles, and now it’s at my right knee. For those of you suffering more than I am, be strong, and something that always makes me feel better is that there is always someone who has it worse than you

    Reply
  7. Jack Hilder Post author

    I had Perthes disease when I was 10 which left me disabled for 4 years. After recovering I became a sports scholar at school for hockey, rugby, and tennis and a qualified as a performance tennis coach. Whilst training in the summer before starting uni to try for the tennis team I developed osteoarthritis in the same hip that was affected by Perthes, it was crushing. It was a mental struggle as much as a physical to be told that I will never be able to compete in a sport to the level I had been used to again. I dropped all sport and exercise from my life through university and hid away, something i regret in hindsight, i graduated this month. However, now I managed to complete tough mudder and I am now training to cycle from Amsterdam to Milan this September. Sport is something I always thought I would have and I was good at it, but you need to get back up again when life knocks you down. If you believe in nothing else, just keep believing in yourself.

    Side note, i am also severely dyslexic and went fully bald by 20. Uni is hard for an artheritic bald dyslexic 20 year old and i felt like i had been given a bad hand. However, I still managed to get to a Russell group uni for Economics and get a girlfriend. Mindset is everything, don't let it consume you, get back up again, find a different path in life.

    Reply
  8. Nightster Post author

    I feel for you young people to be going through such constant pain at such a young age. 
    I am near 60 and didn't start getting pain till in my 40's to the point now its both muscular and joints in hips shoulders and feet, my Doctors don't want to know, one answer was some people in life suffer from pain and unfortunately for you your one of them another was what do you want me to do, its probably a woman thing Fibromyalgia. 
    I requested to be referred to Rheumatology at the RVH Belfast 4 years ago and got a letter 8 months ago asking me do I still want an appointment I of course I replied yes and heard nothing since. 
    Like you lot I won't sit down must keep going, you are an inspiration.

    Reply
  9. Gwenhwyfar Aine Post author

    I had back problems as a child, and was diagnosed with osteoarthritis when I was around 30, and around 33 my spine just fell apart with trauma and it took 3 years before I was given arthritis and bone spurs and two different kinds of spinal deformities. Cannabis makes me 50-80% more mobile and active. Without it, I'm sometimes "okay", but sometimes unable to walk.

    Reply
  10. Michael Blue Post author

    More middle class people, not representing the majority of the population.
    It seems this only affects the middle classes, or only the middle classes matter.
    Please show some plebs from the council estates for once.

    Reply
  11. Kein Chris Post author

    I was diagnosed when I was 3. I’ve had a lot of different flare ups. I walked with a cane for a year when I was 16. I remember peoples always asked “what happened?!” Like it was a sports injury and I felt bad having to tell them, no I have a disease.
    Now I have a new flare in my elbows, somewhere I’ve never had issues before. Feeling very lonely so this made me feel a lot better

    Reply
  12. Wendy Bennett Post author

    I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in my early fifties. Over the years it got worse and I was unable to carry on with my job on a farm. I fell into a depression. Most of the drugs were not taking effect and some had nasty side effects. Was put onto Humira Adalimumab and I got my life back. For the last six months this drug is no longer working and I am slowly losing my ability to function. I live alone and it is hard. My RA doctor is seeking an alternative biological drug. I am living in Italy.

    Reply
  13. pm fitness Post author

    Nandrolone 200mg and testosterone 200mg per week for a couple of months. it will give you New Life

    Reply

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