How Does an Inversion Table (Teetering or Hanging Upside Down) Help Back Pain?

How Does an Inversion Table (Teetering or Hanging Upside Down) Help Back Pain?


53 comments on “How Does an Inversion Table (Teetering or Hanging Upside Down) Help Back Pain?

  1. Swimmin Wit Da Fishies Post author

    ❤️❤️❤️❤️ you guys!! It would amazing to see you in a Sat Night Live skit! They needs LOTS of help with their comedy, and I think you would be just what the doctor ordered!!

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  2. Vicki Moseley Post author

    I had a herniated disc about 5 years – on the advise of my chiropractor, I bought an inversion table and I’ve used it EVERYDAY, when I’m home, since then. I’ve not had another major issue with my back. I get on the inversion table every morning and if I’m a bit achy from yard work I teeter again at night. I was headed for surgery and between this, acupuncture and one steroid shot, I’m in great shape. I also have spinal stenosis and some spondylosis – at 62 I run, do yoga and have hardly any adverse symptoms. YEAH!!

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  3. Smile Smile Post author

    Brad is the most artistic physical therapist on the Internet.
    In my opinion of course.

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  4. Jeannie van eperen Post author

    I have one and it dose help I even went all the way straight down and twist it felt great but they take up a lot of room

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  5. Josh R Post author

    L5s1. Inversion table and ice are the only thing that helps when in pain. I go completely inverted and chill . Sometime s I'll go a half hour. No matter how far or how long it helps. My input just in case it helps anyone. Oh, and I worked my up to hanging completely inverted. Went further and further till I got the hang of it. And sometime s I'll swing like halfway up then back down real fast, over and over. When you do it you feel like you get more stretch out of it. Good luck to anyone with back pain, stuff sucks. Inversion table, huge thumbs up. Teeter hangups one too. Don't cheap out like I did and buy a off brand. Ended up getting the teeter hangups. Worth the extra money.no worries about falling out either on teeter hangups.

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  6. James W Post author

    It was recommended to me by a person I know who has sciatica. He said it cured his pain. Thank you for your video. It's just in time.

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  7. Sarah Diaz Post author

    does the inversion table provide traction in the cervical area as well? what are you thoughts on the y-strap 🙂

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  8. wpy yang Post author

    How do you both feel about spine worx back support alignment? Does the product really help with spine alignment?

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  9. znolette dap Post author

    Another great thing is the big ray strap from spud inc. strap goes around the belt line and provides traction from the hip rather than the ankle.

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  10. justpassingthroughthistime Post author

    I love my table and get wonderful relief for lower back and a horrible neck.
    I recline at about 70 degrees and just hang. no twisty things. there are better more study tables out there than the teeter table. check ebay

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  11. Dan Williams Post author

    It is actually hard to tell sometimes whether you guys are physical therapists or game show hosts. This video was so frenetic that any actual appreciation of the inversion table as a device to achieve beneficial spinal decompression is almost impossible. Cautions against using it by any person with high blood pressure, glaucoma, on blood thinners, with muscular or skeletal weakness, with screws or plates in the spine are definitely in order. Beginning with minimal decline for short periods of time absolutely recommended. Duh and Uhh!

    Relief will almost always be temporary – like most relief – because gravity compresses the spine 99% of the time. So what? Speaking from long term personal experience, if one has thinned disks that result in nerve impingement, spinal decompression via inversion can make sciatica-like symptoms, meralgia paresthetica, and what have you go away for hours, days, or sometimes weeks. Utterly blessed relief with no side effects if you do it right.

    I have been doing inversion therapy on an inversion table for 10 or 12 years now. I started conservatively, but over time I increased my declination to full 180 degree upside down and my duration from 2 or 3 minutes to 17 minutes. While inverted I do a full core body workout with body rotations, side bends, and sit ups, straight and oblique. I also elevate 15 pound dumbells up to my hips as high as I can push them and do 100 "mini dps" during this process. A little later in my routine I pull 20 pound dumbells up to my shoulders and do super slow inverted "pulldowns" from the floor to my shoulders for 2 minutes. This routine has evolved very gradually and progressively over a decade. I can tell you that doing a serious core workout with the spine in tension has too many advantages to enumerate.

    I have an L3/L4 disc that is half a centimeter or so thinner on the right side than it is on the left, and this is, as you might imagine, a problem that requires continuous attention. My inversion routine keeps ever incipient pain at bay, and the core body routine I evolved keeps my torso quite strong and flexible. I might usefully add that I am 80 years old and a serious mountain biker.

    So, the purpose of my comment is to suggest that, despite your chaotic jabber, I can attest from long personal experience that a careful, gradual, progressive use of the inversion table for spinal decompression and core strengthening and flexibilty maintenance can provide benefits that nothing else can match. And I got mine for about $88. Definitely not for everybody, but if you use it carefully and use it right, it can change your life.

    Just to provide some honest and hard earned facts.

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  12. Rasheed9957 Post author

    I dont have bulging disc, but if i do a hand stand can I get decompression on my lower back?

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  13. Richard McCombs Post author

    I have AS and used an inversion table to straighten spine as the back was fusing. It gave me a little relief which was great. My goal was to minimize the curvature of the back as it fused itself. I think it helped but you never know. Now that I’m 100% fused I stopped using it. Switched to the sit down inversion which grabs the thighs instead of ankles. Use this as fusion has entered the neck , need to be real careful with this inversion but I am able to get a little more movement in neck twist. I do this sparingly as neck is scary but hopefully it will help keep me from looking at my shoes all day when fusion finishes there.

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  14. Marie-Danielle O'Reilly Post author

    Thank you for your advice! You are the best for my health.🇨🇭🇨🇭🇨🇭

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  15. Asima Rahim Post author

    Thanks a million you guys are the best in explaining wish I had known this years ago

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  16. Moggridge Post author

    Though the diagram was impressive I felt the explanation could have been enhanced by Bob holding Brad upside down by his ankles. 😨😁

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  17. Becky Lee Post author

    I love my teeter table for my bad shoulder. Allowing it to hang the opposite way to the norm definitely helps reduce frozen shoulder pain, imo.

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  18. John M Post author

    I've been using inversion therapy for almost 50 years after herniating my first (of 4 lumbar discs — was a powerlifter). Started with Dr Martin's inversion boots, then table. I then went to an orthopod and lately an invertrac. If worried about the ankle grips giving try one of the last two. This coupled with regular spinal adjustments has kept me out of surgery and heavy meds.

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  19. DrewSorensenMusic Post author

    In the giveaway section, I thought you said “and maybe one of our Bobs”. Haha. Cracked me up. At 1:10, was “mugs”.
    Love your channel.

    Reply
  20. mike rusch Post author

    Warning I went full upside down and got a torn retina out of it! Be very careful on these things!
    On the other hand the Saebo for foot drop you recommended has been a godsend 🙏

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  21. Fire Rose Post author

    What about zero compression inversions, like yoga hammock or aerial silks as shown in the video thumbnail? Could you please talk about the differences and similarities between those and the inversion table? I've been using a hammock hang for about a month now and I have experienced a lot of relief from my chronic shoulder pain. Those hangs can also be done in a lowered hammock position with the shoulders on the ground for excellent lower back traction without the head rush and less heart risk.

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  22. sayedstafa Post author

    No point in going into full inversion. Your body will be more tense, trying to hold together, and you wont get as much of a stretch. Better to just stick with 60 degree inversion.

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  23. Kamron Thurmond Post author

    I can achieve spinal decompression by hanging with just my fingers and relaxing. It feels quite nice.

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  24. Argon Stern Post author

    @Bob & Brad: Can a teen use an inversion table to boost his chances at growing taller?

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  25. The Graceful Savage Post author

    the two downvotes are people that prefer to twist their spine when its under stress. they must be the lift with your back and twist with a jerking motion type of people.

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  26. The Graceful Savage Post author

    I own the Ironman branded one. its very well built and I definitely trust the ankle shackle mechanism to hold me upside down. youll probably pay the Ironman tax for it but I got mine used for a good price.

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  27. marlene kerrmarlene Post author

    Hi I had a inversion table and used Full inversion for 40 yrs. and never had back trouble- then .now had a hip replacement so imagine cant use it??? but I loved it -would think the blood rushing to your brain would be good for you???? thank you .mine is now sitting in garage and sure miss using it m k wis

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  28. Jan Edmunds Post author

    What about hanging by your knees from monkey bars like a kid — what does that do to the spine?

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  29. Bastian Bauwens Post author

    Started using an inversion table daily in January. Within 3 weeks, all pain from my herniated disc (that I had for 2 years) gradually went away. It was not the only thing I did, but a major factor in recovery. Best investment ever!

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  30. Terri Lanigan Post author

    Should someone with degenerative disc disease use one? Thanks for all of this info and advice!

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  31. michael hernandez Post author

    Noice!

    I'm wondering if anybody has actually died from use/misuse of those….because i'm sure there's a lot of people who have had gotten hurt using them but not actually reporting to a medical care/emergency unless they broke something…

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  32. Jaxon Bricks Post author

    Hi Bob and Brad, what about gravity shoes and knee problems? Can it give the same effect like a pull up bar for shoulders?

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  33. Misty Lee Post author

    I have one of these. I’ve always felt like it helped my pain and dysfunction from lumbar disc disease. Recently I had gynecological surgery. A few days later I vent over and had sudden severe back pain in the lumbar region. Gradually it improved to the point I could walk fine but the muscles were involved at this point. So I hung on the machine at a 45 degree angle like I’ve done many times. But this time the pain was severe and I couldn’t get off without help. Since then my back has been much worse. I got an mri and the doctor found a big difference in it and the MRI from one year ago. Much more herniation. I’m getting a block in a couple of days. I don’t understand what happened.

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  34. Paul H Post author

    Won't you get the same amount of traction by, instead of inverting, simply hanging from, or doing pullups, from a bar? Then you have the weight of your legs helping to stretch the vertebrae.

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