Elevated blood sugar and arthritis

Elevated blood sugar and arthritis


Hey this is Dr. Joe Feuerstein with the
MD Minute. Thanks for tuning in. Today I want to talk about a study that looks
at the link between arthritis, that’s osteoarthritis or wear and tear of the
joints, and diabetes. This study published on RMD Open, which is an
online journal from researchers at the Sorbonne in Paris, looked at 1.2 million
people from 47 different studies. And what it analyzed was the link between
arthritis, the risk of arthritis and diabetes. What they found is that
in looking at all these over 1.2 million people if you would diabetic, your risk
of arthritis was 29% and the same hold true if you had arthritis
your risk of developing diabetes was actually 14%. There’s
clearly some kind of link between the two. Let’s talk a little bit about
osteoarthritis. What we know now is that there’s actually different types,
different reasons for wear and tear of the joints. Osteoarthritis can be because
of age-related changes, which is why commonly arthritis happens in older
people, it can be because of trauma. If you bang your knee or you have some kind
of surgery or fracture to the knee, you’re going to develop arthritis
quicker than if your knee was intact. There’s also now a
recognition that you get arthritis connected to metabolic syndrome. So
everybody argues that the reason for this is because you’re going to get
arthritis, because you’re heavy, your weight is heavy and that will cause a
wear and tear on the joints. The problem with that theory is that what
about arthritis of the hand. If you are heavy, you’re not going to suddenly have
a lot more weight on your hands, so that doesn’t hold true. What they actually
researchers think is that the connection beyond just mechanical stress for
weight is the fact that sugar is inflammatory. If your blood sugars are
high, they’re not just high and it’s not doing anything in your body, they’re
actually causing chemical reactions all over your body. They’re putting glucose
molecules in different structures on different proteins and that’s causing
inflammation, including inflammation in the joints of the hand; so now you can
see how the two are connected. If an elevated blood sugar causes inflammation, it’ll cause inflammation throughout the body in the joints as well including hands. My take on this is that we have to not only work on blood sugar and
reducing our weight but also looking at the connection between inflammation,
blood glucose and arthritis. Dr. Joe Feuerstein with the MD Minute.Thanks for tuning in.

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