CONCUSSIONS: What Causes a Concussion and How Do You Treat It?

CONCUSSIONS: What Causes a Concussion and How Do You Treat It?


Usually, there is some sort of contact, It’s a contact injury. The patient will come with a typical story of
either they’re playing a certain game or they were doing something and accidentally hit
up against a wall or something like that. And then the biggest complaint is generally a
headache that either will won’t go away. And then along with that are just a variety of
symptoms. It can range from confusion to dizziness, pain with bright lights, or with loud noises that don’t seem to go away or get worse if that
stimulus is still there. So for example, if there was a student that was
playing soccer, they collided with another player. They have a few of those symptoms, but not all of
them. I’ll generally do my assessment, check things like
their eye movement and their balance, check their memory, and then sit them out for a little bit. I’ll have them sit in the sit on the stands. I’ll come and check in on them every few minutes
and ask them how they’re doing If just being in the environment that we’re in is
triggering those symptoms to get worse Like the noise of either the players that are
cheering or the audience that might be cheering —or even the music that they play whenever there’s
a timeout, if that starts to irritate them, that makes my
suspicions a little bit higher for a concussion. But a concussion is, like I mentioned, usually,
contact injury, there’s still not a lot of… research to show or prove what happens in the
brain when a concussion occurs. But we believe that there’s probably some
irritation or some inflammation somewhere around the brain that causes the
symptoms to occur. And we know for sure that rest—especially rest
from activity immediately after the injury, can help with the
recovery process.

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