CONCUSSIONS: Common Misconceptions About Concussions

CONCUSSIONS: Common Misconceptions About Concussions


You don’t have to get hit in the head to get a
concussion. So some people think you just have to get a hit in
the head to get a concussion, which, most of what we see is some type of trauma
or accident hit to the head. You can get a shot to the body, and the forces
that move your neck to your head, can also cause concussion. So the interesting part about concussions nowadays
is that we don’t label them as mild, moderate or severe
concussions. It’s either you get a concussion, you’ve got one,
and you get diagnosed with one and you’ve got one. And so we don’t really label them anymore because
every concussion— Even a concussion, if somebody had more than one,
every single one of them is different. Out of the thousands that I’ve seen none of them
are the exactly the same. Not even the same person. Usually parents and coaches have to be aware that
doesn’t just mean a hit to the head. What you’re looking for symptoms. What you’re looking for is if that athlete doesn’t
feel quite right. They get after a play, after they fall, or
something happens. And they’re saying, “Okay, I’m a little dizzy… “I have a little bit of a headache, fogginess.”
Those type of things. I mean, there’s a slew of symptoms; light
sensitivity, sensitivity to noise. The list goes on and on about what those symptoms
are. And with those symptoms, you have to be able to
educate your athlete. That’s the hard part. You talk about youth and kids, and then they didn’t really —I mean, they’ve had a
headache before, they might have a sinus headache. We live in San
Antonio; Allergies are everywhere! So they’re used to maybe having a little bit, but
they can push through it. But it doesn’t happen after a certain incident. And so, in some of these symptoms, they can show
up 24 hours after. Because you have adrenaline, right? And so you kind of ignore, you didn’t quite feel
it. I mean pain tolerances. They’re in the zone for
that game. And then it’s after the game, it might be the next
day that they start to go, “You know, I don’t feel quite right. Something’s
wrong.” Usually I tell parents, “Is this your kid? Are
they talking to you as much?” Usually after a game, they usually are this
talkative or they’re not. Or kind of staring at you a little bit longer. Processing a question, which they normally don’t
do. It’s looking for those little nuances, and you can
usually see them as well. Especially my parents and coaches if they know
their athlete really well as well. They’re like, “Hmm. They’re not saying something
quite right.” I’ve had other athletes actually say, “Hey, Johnny over here doesn’t seem like he’s
answering my question quite right… “Hey, can you go check them out a little bit?” Or they start to go to a different side of the
sideline, or they’re not doing a play that they’re supposed
to be doing. And they know it, and they just didn’t remember. Some of the things that we kind of have to look at
and see, what are some of the symptoms that you’ll get. But
usually you’ll get headache, sensitivity to light, noise, dizziness. Those type
of things.

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