Case Study 17 – Ann With Rheumatoid Arthritis, IBS And Candida

Case Study 17 – Ann With Rheumatoid Arthritis, IBS And Candida


I’m going to do another case history today.
This is a 62-year-old lady called Ann who came into the clinic with rheumatoid arthritis,
a yeast infection, and irritable bowel syndrome. I’m going to read some of the excerpts out
of my book, and then I’ll give you some comments on this case as well. If you’ve got rheumatoid
arthritis or an autoimmune disease, something like lupus or Sjogren’s, a scleroderma or
a condition like that, you could well have an underlying yeast infection or bowel problem.
It’s very, very common. I’m just going to read some bits and pieces out of the book
to familiarize you with the case. Ann is a retired accountant who had been suffering
as long as she can remember with headaches, nasal congestion, irritable bowel syndrome
and several other complaints, including a persistent fungal infection of several toenails.
Six years ago, she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. We also uncovered two root canal
teeth that had been quite sensitive for several years.
I referred Ann to a dentist friend who examined her mouth and mentioned that her two teeth
required extraction because a low-grade infection was present. This can actually be seen on
an x-ray. If you have root canal teeth, particularly if they’re sensitive to touch, the gums bleed
around them, you may want to get an x-ray done. After careful extraction, the sockets
were carefully cleaned, and we waited until her mouth was sufficiently healed before we
undertook a detoxification program that lasted about six weeks. It took four months of treatment,
but her painful fingers and wrists were getting less painful by the week. Remember, this was
rheumatoid arthritis. This patient was taking several medications for rheumatoid arthritis,
including anti-inflammatories and even drugs like methotrexate, which is a chemotherapy
drug. After six months, the pain had gone from a
scale of 8 out of 10 down to 2 out of 10. It improved so much, in fact, her headaches
were long gone and so was her nasal congestion. Many people with root canal teeth, particularly
in the upper jaw, will often have nasal congestion or a sinus infection as a result of basically
the sockets seeding anaerobic bacteria into the maxillary sinus area here.
Her bowel was almost back to normal at this stage. We put Ann on the low allergy diet,
and she had followed this religiously for six months until one day she decided enough
was enough. She started to drink a glass of wine with dinner each evening and then the
chocolates crept back in. She was in my room within two weeks complaining that the pain
had crept back 6 out of 10 and was steadily getting worse by the day.
I asked Ann what had happened and she replied, “Well, I was feeling so good that I thought
a glass of wine here and there wouldn’t hurt.” And she said she was disappointed with the
treatment and she felt she was going backwards. This is when I showed her the diagram and
I said it’s common for someone to feel well and then all of a sudden feel unwell, particularly,
if they slip back into bad habits. In my book, I’ve actually drawn a diagram of how people
think they get well and how they actually recover from a chronic Candida infection or
any kind of chronic illness. I’ve written here, you improve and then you
think all is well, and then you go back to your normal lifestyle. I asked her this, “Did
you improve initially?” She said emphatically, “Yes. I haven’t felt that well for as long
as I can remember.” That’s when I said, “Well, you must have been on the right track then.
The problem is we didn’t keep you on the path long enough and somehow you got lost and took
a side track.” Ann’s husband said that his wife thought that
she was cured, and this is what I commonly find with many people. They start out with
the right intentions. They want to get well bad enough to be good for several weeks to
several months, but then the boredom creeps in. The patient becomes frustrated and wants
to resume the same diet and lifestyle they had prior to developing the complaint. What
they may not be aware of is that one or several of these lifestyle or dietary factors contributed
to the demise of their health initially. If they only held out just that bit longer and
reintroduced these offending foods and drinks slowly, starting with the item that is least
likely to be problematic. People often have a tendency to reintroduce their favorite treats
all too early. This could be you. Many people don’t recover.
But when they do recover and they recover steadily but surely, they slip back. They
start doing the things that they did a long time ago, and then they start regressing or
going backwards again. To them it may seem like the treatment is not working, but what
they did is they went back to old habits. Ann left my clinic understanding that it was
all up to her. It was going to take time and there will be plenty of ups and downs. No
smooth sailing. No quick fixes. No BS. If she’s going to get 100 percent well, she has
to work hard and persistently and be logical in her approach to recovery. I found that
as the gut improves, the fungal condition slowly disappears. And particularly, if you
look at the toenails, you’ll see a clear demarcation of the healthy toenail growing out and the
fungal nail above it. This is a sign that the digestion is improving quite well in most
cases. Doctors see no link between the fungal toenail at all and a Candida digestive problem,
which is ridiculous, because everything in the body is connected.
Are you like Ann? Are you a person who has lost the persistence or the ability to really
want to recover from a yeast infection? That’s the point I’m trying to make here. If you
really want to recover and recover really well, you need to stay on track long enough
and not get sidetracked, not take detours here or there or go sightseeing into things
like chocolates or wine or beer or whatever it is that your treat is because these are
the things that can lead to demise. They can lead to depression and anxiety because you
feel you’re not recovering from this chronic condition.
I hope that’s given you a bit of an insight into recovery from a chronic condition like
rheumatoid arthritis. It is absolutely possible to recover, but it takes a lot of persistence
and hard work on your part. Either that or you stay on pharmaceutical drugs for 10, 20
or 30 years plus and pay the consequences of the devastating side effects of these treatments.
The ball is in your court. Don’t forget to check out yeastinfection.org
and also have a look at my comprehensive, online Candida quiz, my survey. If you go
to CandidaCrusher.com, you can find one of the world’s best online surveys to determine
if you’ve got a mild, moderate or severe yeast infection. Don’t forget my antifungal, Canxida.
You’ll find that at Canxida.com. It’s one of the best antifungal products on the market.
Thanks for checking out my video.

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